News

Have you experienced the dreaded leg cramp?

Have you ever been running in a five-kilometre park run event and bam that awful calf cramp hits! Or have tried to nod off at midnight and your hamstrings just don’t want to settle unless you move! It’s quite an awful feeling isn’t it!

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) and leg cramps are frequent conditions that affect the general population, including athletes, people who exercise, pregnant women, older people and children (1,2,3). Patients can often suffer distressing sensations in the legs, particularly at night-time in the calf or hamstring muscles. Patients report a consistent urge to move that only dissipates while stretching or moving. This often creates disrupted sleep patterns and therefore contributes to fatigue and other health challenges as well (3).

Leg cramps, at rest or during exercise, are characterised by abrupt muscle contraction, most often in the hamstring, quadriceps, calf muscles, feet and toes, and are often painful (2,3). The diagnosis of these uncomfortable disorders has presented a challenge for health care providers as symptoms do overlap with other nervous system and sensory issues (2). While research has been conducted there is no clear treatment option or approach, however magnesium as a natural treatment option may have some benefits to help sufferers in their treatment approaches (2, 4).

How does magnesium help alleviate conditions like leg cramps?

Magnesium is an important mineral that plays a role in neuromuscular transmission and muscle contraction. If the balance of minerals (calcium, potassium and magnesium) and electrolytes in our bodies is not correct then our muscles are more susceptible to cramping, like when we are exercising or when we are trying to sleep. It is preposed that magnesium can play a vital role in alleviating these symptoms by relieving mild muscle spasms while supporting healthy muscle function and relaxation. Magnesium’s other important benefits include supporting heart health and aiding in energy production (5).

Can my diet and fluid intake play a role in increasing magnesium stores and reducing leg cramps?

Yes, it most certainly does! Magnesium is found in fibre rich plant sources particularly green leafy vegetables (spinach and broccoli), legumes (black beans and edamame beans), nuts (almonds, cashews, and peanuts), seeds (sunflower) and whole grains (oats, quinoa and fortified breakfast cereals) just for some examples. Yoghurt and milk are great dairy sources while animal protein sources such as salmon and chicken breast are also great options. Tap, mineral, and bottled waters can also provide liquid sources of magnesium. For other food sources rich in magnesium check out this great link!.

Can other options help reduce leg cramp symptoms?

Drinking more water, less caffeine and minimising alcohol alongside the use of other therapy forms such as massage therapy, yoga, stretching, ice and/or heat packs, and reducing stress levels are other suggested ways to help manage leg cramp and RLS symptoms (7,8,9)

Check out the Green Nutritionals Magnesium Capsules, Green Nutritionals Magnesium Powder or Amazing Oils products to help with your muscle relaxation and getting settled in for a good restful night’s sleep!

 

 

References

  1. Dahle, L., Berg, G., Hammar, M., Hurtig, M., & Larsson, L. (1995). The effect of oral magnesium substitution on pregnancy-induced leg cramps. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 173(1), 175–180. https://doi.org/10.1016/0002-9378(95)90186-8
  2. Roffe, C., Sills, S., Crome, P., & Jones, P. (2002). Randomised, cross-over, placebo controlled trial of magnesium citrate in the treatment of chronic persistent leg cramps. Medical Science Monitor : International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research8(5), CR326–CR330.
  3. Tipton, P., & Wszołek, Z. (2017). Restless legs syndrome and nocturnal leg cramps: A review and guide to diagnosis and treatment. Polish Archives of Internal Medicine127(12), 865–872. https://doi.org/10.20452/pamw.4148
  4. Guerrera, M. P., Volpe, S. L., & Mao, J. J. (2009). Therapeutic uses of magnesium. American Physician80(2), 157–162.
  5. https://www.blackmores.com.au/arthritis-joint-bone-and-muscle/how-to-prevent-muscle-cramps
  6. https://www.blackmores.com.au/energy/10-magnesium-foods-for-your-health
  7. https://www.blackmores.com.au/arthritis-joint-bone-and-muscle/discover-the-benefits-of-magnesium
  8. Innes, K. E., Selfe, T. K., Agarwal, P., Williams, K., & Flack, K. L. (2013). Efficacy of an eight-week yoga intervention on symptoms of restless legs syndrome (RLS): A pilot study. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 19(6), 527–535. https://doi.org/10.1089/acm.2012.0330
  9. https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/muscle-cramp
Read more

Have you experienced the dreaded leg cramp?

Have you ever been running in a five-kilometre park run event and bam that awful calf cramp hits! Or have tried to nod off at midnight and your hamstrings just don’t want to settle unless you move! It’s quite an awful feeling isn’t it!

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) and leg cramps are frequent conditions that affect the general population, including athletes, people who exercise, pregnant women, older people and children (1,2,3). Patients can often suffer distressing sensations in the legs, particularly at night-time in the calf or hamstring muscles. Patients report a consistent urge to move that only dissipates while stretching or moving. This often creates disrupted sleep patterns and therefore contributes to fatigue and other health challenges as well (3).

Leg cramps, at rest or during exercise, are characterised by abrupt muscle contraction, most often in the hamstring, quadriceps, calf muscles, feet and toes, and are often painful (2,3). The diagnosis of these uncomfortable disorders has presented a challenge for health care providers as symptoms do overlap with other nervous system and sensory issues (2). While research has been conducted there is no clear treatment option or approach, however magnesium as a natural treatment option may have some benefits to help sufferers in their treatment approaches (2, 4).

How does magnesium help alleviate conditions like leg cramps?

Magnesium is an important mineral that plays a role in neuromuscular transmission and muscle contraction. If the balance of minerals (calcium, potassium and magnesium) and electrolytes in our bodies is not correct then our muscles are more susceptible to cramping, like when we are exercising or when we are trying to sleep. It is preposed that magnesium can play a vital role in alleviating these symptoms by relieving mild muscle spasms while supporting healthy muscle function and relaxation. Magnesium’s other important benefits include supporting heart health and aiding in energy production (5).

Can my diet and fluid intake play a role in increasing magnesium stores and reducing leg cramps?

Yes, it most certainly does! Magnesium is found in fibre rich plant sources particularly green leafy vegetables (spinach and broccoli), legumes (black beans and edamame beans), nuts (almonds, cashews, and peanuts), seeds (sunflower) and whole grains (oats, quinoa and fortified breakfast cereals) just for some examples. Yoghurt and milk are great dairy sources while animal protein sources such as salmon and chicken breast are also great options. Tap, mineral, and bottled waters can also provide liquid sources of magnesium. For other food sources rich in magnesium check out this great link!.

Can other options help reduce leg cramp symptoms?

Drinking more water, less caffeine and minimising alcohol alongside the use of other therapy forms such as massage therapy, yoga, stretching, ice and/or heat packs, and reducing stress levels are other suggested ways to help manage leg cramp and RLS symptoms (7,8,9)

Check out the Green Nutritionals Magnesium Capsules, Green Nutritionals Magnesium Powder or Amazing Oils products to help with your muscle relaxation and getting settled in for a good restful night’s sleep!

 

 

References

  1. Dahle, L., Berg, G., Hammar, M., Hurtig, M., & Larsson, L. (1995). The effect of oral magnesium substitution on pregnancy-induced leg cramps. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 173(1), 175–180. https://doi.org/10.1016/0002-9378(95)90186-8
  2. Roffe, C., Sills, S., Crome, P., & Jones, P. (2002). Randomised, cross-over, placebo controlled trial of magnesium citrate in the treatment of chronic persistent leg cramps. Medical Science Monitor : International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research8(5), CR326–CR330.
  3. Tipton, P., & Wszołek, Z. (2017). Restless legs syndrome and nocturnal leg cramps: A review and guide to diagnosis and treatment. Polish Archives of Internal Medicine127(12), 865–872. https://doi.org/10.20452/pamw.4148
  4. Guerrera, M. P., Volpe, S. L., & Mao, J. J. (2009). Therapeutic uses of magnesium. American Physician80(2), 157–162.
  5. https://www.blackmores.com.au/arthritis-joint-bone-and-muscle/how-to-prevent-muscle-cramps
  6. https://www.blackmores.com.au/energy/10-magnesium-foods-for-your-health
  7. https://www.blackmores.com.au/arthritis-joint-bone-and-muscle/discover-the-benefits-of-magnesium
  8. Innes, K. E., Selfe, T. K., Agarwal, P., Williams, K., & Flack, K. L. (2013). Efficacy of an eight-week yoga intervention on symptoms of restless legs syndrome (RLS): A pilot study. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 19(6), 527–535. https://doi.org/10.1089/acm.2012.0330
  9. https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/muscle-cramp
Read more

Your hair reflects your inner health and wellbeing. An unhealthy lifestyle, tiredness and stress can all take a toll on your hair. However, the good news is that hair also has the ability to transform the way you look and feel. Consider these good haircare tips to keep your hair looking naturally gorgeous.

  1. Banish split ends by having your hair trimmed regularly. Use a wide-toothed comb rather than a brush on wet hair and avoid overheating your hair when blow-drying.
  2. To treat dandruff, choose a naturally based product that does not contain metal oxides. Rinse your hair well after a dandruff treatment and avoid touching the scalp as it may be more prone to picking up infection.
  3. Always use a good quality hairbrush. Poor-quality brushes and combs will scratch the scalp and damage the hair shaft. Avoid over brushing your hair since this will stimulate sebum production encouraging oily hair, breakages and split ends.
  4. Brush your hair before washing it to massage the scalp and help loosen dead skin cells.
  5. Never use hotter than medium when blow-drying. Finish your blow-dry with a blast of cool air to close the cuticles – when cuticles lie flat, hair reflect the light and looks healthier and shinier.
  6. If you colour your hair, avoid non-organic dyes, especially peroxide.
  7. Avoid over-drying colour-treated hair with dryers, heated rollers or straighten tongs. Let it dry naturally, if possible.
  8. If you are ‘of a certain age’, why not forget about colourants and consider letting your natural grey/slivering hair colour come through? Perhaps make a fresh start and have your hair cut in a shorter style to remove all the damaged, discoloured and mistreated hair.
  9. Try conditioning your hair with natural ingredients
  10. Protect colour-treated hair against the effects of the sun, sea and swimming pools. Wear a hat or scarf in hot sun, wear a swimming cap or apply a conditioner to act as a barrier against chlorine. Always shampoo hair immediately after swimming.
Read more

Your hair reflects your inner health and wellbeing. An unhealthy lifestyle, tiredness and stress can all take a toll on your hair. However, the good news is that hair also has the ability to transform the way you look and feel. Consider these good haircare tips to keep your hair looking naturally gorgeous.

  1. Banish split ends by having your hair trimmed regularly. Use a wide-toothed comb rather than a brush on wet hair and avoid overheating your hair when blow-drying.
  2. To treat dandruff, choose a naturally based product that does not contain metal oxides. Rinse your hair well after a dandruff treatment and avoid touching the scalp as it may be more prone to picking up infection.
  3. Always use a good quality hairbrush. Poor-quality brushes and combs will scratch the scalp and damage the hair shaft. Avoid over brushing your hair since this will stimulate sebum production encouraging oily hair, breakages and split ends.
  4. Brush your hair before washing it to massage the scalp and help loosen dead skin cells.
  5. Never use hotter than medium when blow-drying. Finish your blow-dry with a blast of cool air to close the cuticles – when cuticles lie flat, hair reflect the light and looks healthier and shinier.
  6. If you colour your hair, avoid non-organic dyes, especially peroxide.
  7. Avoid over-drying colour-treated hair with dryers, heated rollers or straighten tongs. Let it dry naturally, if possible.
  8. If you are ‘of a certain age’, why not forget about colourants and consider letting your natural grey/slivering hair colour come through? Perhaps make a fresh start and have your hair cut in a shorter style to remove all the damaged, discoloured and mistreated hair.
  9. Try conditioning your hair with natural ingredients
  10. Protect colour-treated hair against the effects of the sun, sea and swimming pools. Wear a hat or scarf in hot sun, wear a swimming cap or apply a conditioner to act as a barrier against chlorine. Always shampoo hair immediately after swimming.
Read more

An essential oil that is inhaled is absorbed into the bloodstream much faster than one absorbed through the skin. 
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An essential oil that is inhaled is absorbed into the bloodstream much faster than one absorbed through the skin. 
Read more

Do you hear the words "Goal Setting" and roll your eyes or think - "yeah yeah - been there done that"?

Let me share part of my story with you. Because I used to do the same thing.

There have been so many years, I started out with great intentions and determination, however I never achieved what I wanted. Someone once said to me "you don't want it enough". I must admit I was a bit taken aback by this because I really do, until I realised I was "wishing" for it rather than making a plan and taking purposeful actions.

I used to say that I was too busy to stop and write a list, I just had to get on with it and get it done. However, I can testify that it doesn't work like that. Without a clear, detailed and purposeful plan - 99% of the time, you won't achieve anything and burn out in the process.

Goal Setting is more than writing a list, however it is worth your time to go through the steps. You may have heard of SMART Goals. (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant & Timely). We are going to work on that but I am also going to add FUN (Feeling, Understanding & Nurturing)

Let's start with the basics. Grab a notebook and start answering these questions.

What do you want to achieve?

Some people struggle with this question. Please let me help you. You are worthy! No matter what your childhood was like, your current situation or what others say about you - you are worthy of a good life. 

You may have been looking after everyone else for so long, you don't know what you want. Be brave to dream big.

You do need to be very specific when deciding what you want to achieve. For example, if you want to lose weight - how much do you want to lose?

How will you measure your goal?

When setting your goal, you need to be able to measure your progress and the final result.

Depending on your goal, this could be a weekly weigh in, a daily checklist or a monthly financial review.

Is your goal achievable?

You do need to dream big, because a goal will need to take you outside of your comfort zone but it also needs to be achievable.

How do you find this balance? It can be different for everyone, however one way is to look at your previous achievements (don't tell you don't have any, because you got up today - that's a huge achievement because you haven't given up). 

When your look back at what you have achieved, realise that you have actually conquered fear & doubt and stepped out of your comfort zone. (Way to go you!). You CAN do it again and you CAN do so much more.

One thing I'd like to add in this section is having a goal that is achievable isn't something you are already doing. You do need to push though, however don't start with something impossible (for now). For example, if you want to have a property portfolio - start with working towards having one property, and not 20 properties in the first year.

Is your goal relevant?

Your goal needs to be relevant to you. Some people make goals to please other people but those goals end up failing and you could start to resent the person you are doing it for.

Goal setting is all about you. And this isn't a selfish thing, it's more of a self care thing!

When do you want to achieve your goal?

You may have heard "write a goal in stone and the time frame in sand so you can move it if you need to". This is true, however don't use it as a cop out or an excuse.

Set a good time frame for your goal. The bigger the goal - the more time you will need. You can break it down into timely segments. For example, if you want to lose 10 kilos, you can set a time frame of losing 1 kilo per week with the end time frame being 10 weeks.

Now for some FUN!

When setting your goal - involve your Feelings. How will you feel when you achieve your goal? What will it look like? Let your imagination take hold. I like to have a vision board when doing this. Include words and pictures to describe how you will feel.

One thing that can happen with goals and taking actions to change our lives, is that we self sabotage. This is because deep down we don't believe we are worthy or capable. This is where we need Understanding. Start paying attention to your thoughts and words about yourself and write them down. As you are working through your goal process, keep a journal of these and any negative actions you take towards your goal. Capturing these negatives will help you because you can easily change them into positives. For example, if you say "I can't do this" stop saying that and say "I can do this". You may feel silly for awhile - but I promise you it will make a huge difference.

This brings us to Nurturing. You need to be kind to yourself. It takes a lot of emotional, mental and physical energy to make changes in our lives. We all make mistakes but we have to keep getting up and start again. Don't beat yourself up when you make a boo boo, admit it - then move on.

 

I hope this helps you get started on your goals for 2020.

Carrie x

Read more

Do you hear the words "Goal Setting" and roll your eyes or think - "yeah yeah - been there done that"?

Let me share part of my story with you. Because I used to do the same thing.

There have been so many years, I started out with great intentions and determination, however I never achieved what I wanted. Someone once said to me "you don't want it enough". I must admit I was a bit taken aback by this because I really do, until I realised I was "wishing" for it rather than making a plan and taking purposeful actions.

I used to say that I was too busy to stop and write a list, I just had to get on with it and get it done. However, I can testify that it doesn't work like that. Without a clear, detailed and purposeful plan - 99% of the time, you won't achieve anything and burn out in the process.

Goal Setting is more than writing a list, however it is worth your time to go through the steps. You may have heard of SMART Goals. (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant & Timely). We are going to work on that but I am also going to add FUN (Feeling, Understanding & Nurturing)

Let's start with the basics. Grab a notebook and start answering these questions.

What do you want to achieve?

Some people struggle with this question. Please let me help you. You are worthy! No matter what your childhood was like, your current situation or what others say about you - you are worthy of a good life. 

You may have been looking after everyone else for so long, you don't know what you want. Be brave to dream big.

You do need to be very specific when deciding what you want to achieve. For example, if you want to lose weight - how much do you want to lose?

How will you measure your goal?

When setting your goal, you need to be able to measure your progress and the final result.

Depending on your goal, this could be a weekly weigh in, a daily checklist or a monthly financial review.

Is your goal achievable?

You do need to dream big, because a goal will need to take you outside of your comfort zone but it also needs to be achievable.

How do you find this balance? It can be different for everyone, however one way is to look at your previous achievements (don't tell you don't have any, because you got up today - that's a huge achievement because you haven't given up). 

When your look back at what you have achieved, realise that you have actually conquered fear & doubt and stepped out of your comfort zone. (Way to go you!). You CAN do it again and you CAN do so much more.

One thing I'd like to add in this section is having a goal that is achievable isn't something you are already doing. You do need to push though, however don't start with something impossible (for now). For example, if you want to have a property portfolio - start with working towards having one property, and not 20 properties in the first year.

Is your goal relevant?

Your goal needs to be relevant to you. Some people make goals to please other people but those goals end up failing and you could start to resent the person you are doing it for.

Goal setting is all about you. And this isn't a selfish thing, it's more of a self care thing!

When do you want to achieve your goal?

You may have heard "write a goal in stone and the time frame in sand so you can move it if you need to". This is true, however don't use it as a cop out or an excuse.

Set a good time frame for your goal. The bigger the goal - the more time you will need. You can break it down into timely segments. For example, if you want to lose 10 kilos, you can set a time frame of losing 1 kilo per week with the end time frame being 10 weeks.

Now for some FUN!

When setting your goal - involve your Feelings. How will you feel when you achieve your goal? What will it look like? Let your imagination take hold. I like to have a vision board when doing this. Include words and pictures to describe how you will feel.

One thing that can happen with goals and taking actions to change our lives, is that we self sabotage. This is because deep down we don't believe we are worthy or capable. This is where we need Understanding. Start paying attention to your thoughts and words about yourself and write them down. As you are working through your goal process, keep a journal of these and any negative actions you take towards your goal. Capturing these negatives will help you because you can easily change them into positives. For example, if you say "I can't do this" stop saying that and say "I can do this". You may feel silly for awhile - but I promise you it will make a huge difference.

This brings us to Nurturing. You need to be kind to yourself. It takes a lot of emotional, mental and physical energy to make changes in our lives. We all make mistakes but we have to keep getting up and start again. Don't beat yourself up when you make a boo boo, admit it - then move on.

 

I hope this helps you get started on your goals for 2020.

Carrie x

Read more

The bugs that live in your gut are now widely recognised as being essential not only for the health of the gut itself, but for wider good health.  The so called gut “microbiome” (the sum total of all the bugs living in your gut) is now convincingly linked to health issues as diverse as mental health, weight control and having a strong immune system.

There are trillions of bugs in the gut microbiome, making up between one and three percent of the hosts body weight.  They exist like any other organ in your body and just like other organs, the gut microbiome is essential for your body to work properly.  The bugs in your gut are part of you.  You need them and they need you – sounds like a symbiotic relationship made in heaven, right?

Unfortunately, for many people the relationship between their gut and its bugs is not a happy one.  Use of antibiotics, processed food, prolonged stress or excess alcohol can all lead to an imbalance of good and bad bugs, resulting in an array of gut or other symptoms. 

Signs and symptoms of an unhappy gut include bloating, flatulence, abdominal pain, diarrhoea or constipation or a feeling of incomplete bowel emptying.  Those with gut symptoms are all too familiar with the discomfort and embarrassment that comes with them. 

By far the best way of looking after your gut microbiome is through the food you eat.  Dietary fibre from fruit and vegetables feeds good bacteria, while processed starches, for example those found is white flour (think pasta and pizza) allow harmful bacteria to proliferate and do nothing to feed the good bacteria.  

A great rule of thumb for keeping your gut healthy is adding a few extra veges to your diet each day.  Don’t worry too much about sourcing the “ultimate” gut health vegetables (all veges are good for the gut), I mean, who buys artichokes on a regular basis anyway?  Another easy addition is that of cooked, then cooled potatoes or rice (think potato salad or sushi).  These foods contain something called Resistant Starch which is emerging as being uniquely beneficial for feeding good bacteria in the colon.  

When our gut microbiome is out of balance another problem can emerge.  Candida can proliferate and cause havoc.  Candida is a common fungi, best known as the cause of vaginal thrush. 

When overproduced in the gut, Candida can damage the wall of the intestine making it leaky and allowing molecules from the gut into the bloodstream.  Some of these molecules are not supposed to be in the bloodstream and cause toxic effects. 

Overgrowth of Candida in the gut has been attributed to symptoms as diverse as brain fog, fatigue, recurring vaginal infections and irritability.  If you think you may have Candida overgrowth in the gut, improving your diet is absolutely essential.  At the risk of harping on, reducing or eliminating refined carbohydrates and sugars, while increasing intake of vegetables is key. 

Some experts suggest it may take up to 6 months to clear Candida overgrowth from your gut through diet modifications alone.  There are several other steps that can be taken to accelerate the road to wellness.  These steps include:

  • Taking probiotics to boost the population of good bacteria in the gut – this may eventually crowd out Candida.
  • Taking an anti-fungal supplement such as Kolorex Advanced Intestinal Care. This product contains Horopito which is an herb native to New Zealand that is known to have anti-fungal properties.  It also contains Aniseed which is traditionally used to support intestinal health and has an immediate soothing effect on the gut. 

The old adage “you are what you eat” has been known for generations.  It remains true to this day and is perhaps more important than ever as we face increasing stress and an array of cheap and easy processed foods.  The best approach is to be mindful of what you eat – and always look for options with the most vegetables.

A big thanks to Kolorex for writing this blog post. We are thrilled to be one of their Australian retailers. Check out their range here

Read more

The bugs that live in your gut are now widely recognised as being essential not only for the health of the gut itself, but for wider good health.  The so called gut “microbiome” (the sum total of all the bugs living in your gut) is now convincingly linked to health issues as diverse as mental health, weight control and having a strong immune system.

There are trillions of bugs in the gut microbiome, making up between one and three percent of the hosts body weight.  They exist like any other organ in your body and just like other organs, the gut microbiome is essential for your body to work properly.  The bugs in your gut are part of you.  You need them and they need you – sounds like a symbiotic relationship made in heaven, right?

Unfortunately, for many people the relationship between their gut and its bugs is not a happy one.  Use of antibiotics, processed food, prolonged stress or excess alcohol can all lead to an imbalance of good and bad bugs, resulting in an array of gut or other symptoms. 

Signs and symptoms of an unhappy gut include bloating, flatulence, abdominal pain, diarrhoea or constipation or a feeling of incomplete bowel emptying.  Those with gut symptoms are all too familiar with the discomfort and embarrassment that comes with them. 

By far the best way of looking after your gut microbiome is through the food you eat.  Dietary fibre from fruit and vegetables feeds good bacteria, while processed starches, for example those found is white flour (think pasta and pizza) allow harmful bacteria to proliferate and do nothing to feed the good bacteria.  

A great rule of thumb for keeping your gut healthy is adding a few extra veges to your diet each day.  Don’t worry too much about sourcing the “ultimate” gut health vegetables (all veges are good for the gut), I mean, who buys artichokes on a regular basis anyway?  Another easy addition is that of cooked, then cooled potatoes or rice (think potato salad or sushi).  These foods contain something called Resistant Starch which is emerging as being uniquely beneficial for feeding good bacteria in the colon.  

When our gut microbiome is out of balance another problem can emerge.  Candida can proliferate and cause havoc.  Candida is a common fungi, best known as the cause of vaginal thrush. 

When overproduced in the gut, Candida can damage the wall of the intestine making it leaky and allowing molecules from the gut into the bloodstream.  Some of these molecules are not supposed to be in the bloodstream and cause toxic effects. 

Overgrowth of Candida in the gut has been attributed to symptoms as diverse as brain fog, fatigue, recurring vaginal infections and irritability.  If you think you may have Candida overgrowth in the gut, improving your diet is absolutely essential.  At the risk of harping on, reducing or eliminating refined carbohydrates and sugars, while increasing intake of vegetables is key. 

Some experts suggest it may take up to 6 months to clear Candida overgrowth from your gut through diet modifications alone.  There are several other steps that can be taken to accelerate the road to wellness.  These steps include:

  • Taking probiotics to boost the population of good bacteria in the gut – this may eventually crowd out Candida.
  • Taking an anti-fungal supplement such as Kolorex Advanced Intestinal Care. This product contains Horopito which is an herb native to New Zealand that is known to have anti-fungal properties.  It also contains Aniseed which is traditionally used to support intestinal health and has an immediate soothing effect on the gut. 

The old adage “you are what you eat” has been known for generations.  It remains true to this day and is perhaps more important than ever as we face increasing stress and an array of cheap and easy processed foods.  The best approach is to be mindful of what you eat – and always look for options with the most vegetables.

A big thanks to Kolorex for writing this blog post. We are thrilled to be one of their Australian retailers. Check out their range here

Read more